A Precious Garland of the Supreme Path – Gampopa (Part 4)

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A Precious Garland of the Supreme Path – Gampopa (Part 4)

16. The Eleven Marks of a Holy person
1. It is a mark of a holy person to have little jealousy and pride.
2. It is a mark of a holy person to have little desire and to be content with meager possessions.
3. It is a mark of a holy person to be without haughtiness, vanity, and arrogance.
4. It is a mark of a holy person to be without deception and pretense.
5. It is a mark of a holy person to examine any action with alertness and to perform it with alert mindfulness.
6. It is a mark of a holy person to attend to the results of actions as carefully as one protects the pupils of one’s eyes.
7. It is a mark of a holy person to be without pretense with regard to vows and samaya.
8. It is a mark of a holy person to be without preference and infatuation toward senteint beings.
9. It is a mark of a holy person not to be angered by the wrong-doing of others, but to have patience.
10. It is a mark of a holy person to give all victory to other people and accept all defeat oneself.
11. It is a mark of a holy person to be unlike worldly people in all thoughts and conduct.
Those are the eleven marks of a holy person. Their opposites are the marks of an unholy person.

17. The Ten Things of No Benefit
1. Since no matter how much service and attention you pay to your illusory body, it is impermanent and certain to be destroyed, there is no benefit.
2. Since no matter how much greed and avarice you have for possessions and wealth, you will die naked and with empty hands,there is no benefit.
3. Since no matter how much trouble you go to in the construction of castles and mansions, you will die alone and your corpse will be put out the door, there is no benefit.
4. Since no matter how many things you lovingly give your children, nephews, and nieces, on the day of your death they will not have an instant’s power to help you, there is no benefit.
5. Since no matter how much attention and concern you lavish on family and friends, you will die alone without their company, there is no benefit.
6. Since even if you have many children, nephews and nieces, they are impermanent, and it is therefore certain that the things you give them will be abandoned, there is no benefit.
7. Since no matter how much effort you put into the acquisition of property and authority and its execution, on the day of your death your connection with your region will cease, there is no benefit.
8. Since having entered the gate of Dharma through faith, if you do not conduct yourself in accordance with Dharma it will cause lower migrations, there is no benefit.
9. Since no matter how much Dharma you know, having trained your mind in hearing and reflection, if it is not practiced you will have nothing by which to take death onto path, there is no benefit.
10. Since even if you remain for a long time in the presence of a holy teacher, if you have no faith and respect you will not receive his qualities or blessing, there is no benefit.
Those are the ten things of no benefit.

18. The Ten Ways of Accomplishing One’s Own Disaster.
1. When a single person marries it is like a fool eating virulent poison, and is the purchase of one’s own disaster.
2. Wrong-doing devoid of Dharma is like a lunatic leaping into an abyss, and is accomplishing one’s own disaster.
3. Deceiving others with charlatanism is like serving poisoned food, and accomplishes one’s own disaster.
4. For someone of little intelligence to lead people is like an old woman guarding cattle, and is the accomplishment of one’s own disaster.
5. To exert oneself in benefiting oneself, motivated by the eight worldly dharmas, rather than exerting oneself in benefiting others through an excellent motivation, is like a sightless person wandering the nothern steppes, and is accomplishing one’s own disaster.
6. Undertakinga great endeavor that one cannot accomplish is like a weak person trying to carry a heavy burden, and is accomplishing one’s own disaster.
7. Disregarding through pride one’s holy guru and the Victor’s teachings is like a rash ruler ignoring his council, and is accomplishing one’s own disaster. Deffering practice and wandering through the communities of ordinary people is like a wild animal wandering int o an inhabited valley, and is accomplishing one’s own disaster.
8. Not fostering natural wisdom, but being disturbed by the elaborations of distractions, is like a garuda breaking its wings, and is accomplishing one’s own disaster.
9. Carelessly consuming the property of the guru and the Three Jewels is like a small child cramming embers into its mouth, and is accomplishing one’s own disaster.
Those are the ten ways of accomplishing one’s own disaster.

19. The Ten Things That Are Great Kindnesses to Oneself.
1. To abandon the attachment and aversion of human affairs and practice divine Dharma is a great kindness to oneself.
2. To abandon cohabitation and companionship, and to rely upon holy person, is a great kindness to oneself.
3. To abandon activities of distraction and cultivate hearing, reflection, and meditation, is a great kindness to oneself.
4. To abandon familiarity with villagers and live alone in solitude is a great kindness to oneself.
5. To cut through the entanglements of desirable things, and remain independent and without attachment, is a great kindness to oneself.
6. To be content with meager things and have no desire for or interest in fine things is a great kindness to oneself.
7. Not to surrender one’s freedom to others, but to stablize one’s practice, is a great kindness to oneself.
8. Not to look toward the immediate pleasures of this life,but to accomplish the permanet pleasure of awakening, is a great kindness to oneself.
9. To abandon fixation on the reality of things and to cultivate emptiness is a great kindness to oneself.
10. Not leaving one’s three gates in the ordinary state but endeavoring to unify the two accumulations is a great kindness to oneself.
Those are the ten things that are great kindness to oneself.

20. The Ten Perfect Things.
1. Trusting in the results of actions is the perfect view for one of lesser capacity.
2. Realizing that all external and internal dharmas are the four unities—appearance and emptiness, awareness and emptiness—is the perfect view for one of intermediate capacity.
3. Realizing that the viewed, the viewer, and the realization are indivisble is the perfect view for one of the highest capacity.
4. To abide one-pointedly on the object is the perfect meditation for one of lesser capacity.
5. To abide in the samadhi of the four unities is the perfect meditation for one of intermediate capacity.
6. To abide without concept in the indivisibility of meditated, meditator, and practice is the perfect meditation for one of the highest capacity.
7. Guarding the results of actions like the pupils of one’s eyes is the perfect conduct for one of lesser capacity.
8. Experiencing all dharmas as like dreams and illusions is the perfect conduct for one of intermediate capacity.
9. Being without any conduct whatsoever is the perfect conduct for one of the highest capacity.
10. Lessening and pacifying all kleshas and the fixation on a self is the perfect sign of progress sign of progress for those of the highest, intermediate, or lesser capacity.
Those are the ten perfect things.